Snapshots

The Faculty of Education, in collaboration with ResearchImpact has developed clear language research summaries called Research Snapshots. Based on completed single research studies, and approved by the researcher, these summaries provide greater access to research findings.

Highlighted in this section are Research Snapshots for faculty projects in Education.

Search Snapshots Researcher:     

Researcher:

Key Message:

Most homeless youth do not lack the motivation to work and do not prefer a criminal lifestyle to a law-abiding one. Homeless youth see deviant and criminal activities as a short term economic necessity for survival rather than as a lifestyle choice.


Researcher:

Key Message:

The issue of homelessness and prisoner re-entry deserves more political attention. Almost every prisoner will eventually be released back into the community. Therefore, it is important to improve discharge planning and re-entry programs for inmates.


Researcher:

Key Message:

Compared to youth who have homes, street youth are much more likely to be victims of crime. Young homeless women are particularly vulnerable.


Researcher:

Key Message:

Being homeless exposes young people to dangerous people and places. It marginalizes youth and makes them more vulnerable to violence and victimization.


Researcher:

Key Message:

Recent policies that claim to help homeless people are having a negative effect on their nutrition. Instead of helping homeless youth become independent and find their own income, the policies force youth to rely on limited emergency food aid. This will not help them break out of the chains of homelessness. Rather, it will make them more dependent in the long-run.


Researcher:

Key Message:

Researchers do not have to rely on traditional approaches to academic publishing. With changing technologies knowledge mobilizers have an increasing variety of tools. Using ‘design thinking’ can lead to innovative approaches to publishing strategically designed to increase the reach of research.


Researcher:

Key Message:

In order to welcome LGBTQ students, families and teachers into schools, we need to embrace the risk that comes with the confusion, tensions or imperfection of inclusion.


Researcher:

Key Message:

A general understanding of audience as consisting of diverse groups including community, industry, and academy is needed to engage with this work. The researchers will provide an overview of their research projects and then proceed to discuss questions on information sharing related to their work.


Researcher:

Key Message:

Parent research teams offer the chance to break out of school-centred or family-centred approaches to school change. It offers an opportunity to collaborate and give meaningful roles for each stakeholder to create knowledge and to act.


Researcher:

Key Message:

Epidemic is an effective digital learning technology. It keeps students engaged and is a valuable resource for information about viruses and health. It promotes a more health-conscious life.


Researcher:

Key Message:

Research on gender and video games often conflates gender with sex, which leads to stereotyping of girls and women. In general, research on gameplay treats women like a second sex and gender like an insignificant variable.


Researcher:

Key Message:

Elementary schools should allot a half-day block each week towards project-based, shared learning. Through guidance, schools can consider ways to create inclusive, and reflective, digitally-enabled language and literacy instruction.


Researcher:

Key Message:

Web 2.0 and its participation-based culture offer rich possibilities for developing websites with museums in the Global South museum. It also offers spaces for virtual learning, and representing and expressing one’s culture. However, technology and partnerships between the Global North and South have a recolonizing potential. Decybercolonizing viewpoints and methods are needed to create web spaces for Global South museums. They bring attention to virtual spaces that can be colonized by the ideologies of the Global North.


Researcher:

Key Message:

High achieving students are very satisfied with courses that use blended learning (both face-to-face and online activities). They are most satisfied with the flexibility and convenience of blended courses, while feeling engaged and learning concepts better. Courses need to accommodate or offer different class formats to low achieving students, who did not feel satisfied with blended learning.


Researcher:

Key Message:

After-school programs, focused on immigrant students and their parents, can improve the performance of students and also get parents more involved in their children’s schooling. It is important to use diversity as a resource in the classroom.


Researcher:

Key Message:

Principals are not neutral leaders. They use political skills in their work every day in order to manage and advocate on their schools' distinct needs. Principal training programs need to address political skills in their curriculum.


Researcher:

Key Message:

The new Chinese model of the university sees the university as the state's educational and research arm for national development. the model, which is increasing in global influence, has both flaws and advantages for China and the world.